joushikijin

psychologists | linguists

Ongoing projects

Resident series

We decided to launch our second project in July 2021. We call it the Resident series and will collaborate with five of our most favourite artists. Over the next year, they will showcase what they have been listening to recently, focusing on promoting other underground artists. Contrary to our nature to plan everything, this will be the only project without any specific dates. It was a deliberate choice to allow each artist enough time for their work to mature into something they will look back at proudly. Thus, we aim for a four-to-six week release cycle and will drop each set without prior announcement.

Pandemic chronicles

In one way or another, the coronavirus pandemic has put an extraordinary strain on all of us. For more than a year, most of us have been restricted in the way we live our lives. Celebrating techno culture live seems like a distant memory. Considering the circumstances, it could be perceived as trivial to feel the urge to party. However, embracing these nights is precisely what makes us human. We connect with hundreds or thousands of strangers through a collective goal, getting lost in the music. Being unable to socialise in this way has affected all of our mental health.

As a result, we have decided to collaborate with several artists to bring you a series of techno sets on our SoundCloud page. Each set is accompanied by an interview, which will be published below. The questions are focused on the way the pandemic has affected the artists professionally and personally. We hope these podcasts and interviews will allow people some much-needed distraction from the current madness until the day we can go out and make new memories again.

Interviews

We start our pandemic chronicles podcast with Bertman. He holds a unique place in our hearts since he was one of the last persons we got to hear perform live. He is the resident DJ of the magnificent Spazio 900, one of the most epic and memorable nightclubs in Roma’s Eur district. He also played during Cosmo’s 2019 Capodanno (New Years) and Cosmo’s 2020 Fuori orario (after party). The latter is one of Rome’s biggest raves, hosting the best lineup of the techno scene. This event alone is worth visiting the city. People from all over the country meet in the capital to spend two nights celebrating the best Italian techno culture has to offer. We thank Luis for taking the time to answer our questions and providing us with a solid set, characterised by its typical Italian flow and smoothness. Listening to it makes us feel melancholic. However, it also allows us to look forward to the near future, celebrating a weekend in Spazio 900, listening to Bertman live again.

 

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

Bertman: I feel sad. It has been more than one year that I can no longer work to perform in front of my clubbers.

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

Bertman: Mentally, I’m tired of staying at home on weekends, but I’m very charged as soon as we can get back to normal.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

Bertman: Creating music gives me happiness and the desire to improve and see my productions on Saturday evening appreciated by clubbers.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

Bertman: Boredom, but I took the opportunity to create new music and experiment with new electronic sounds.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

Bertman: That family and friends are very important.

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

Bertman: Richie Hawtin, a great artist, and music innovator.

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

Bertman: Go out for walks. I look forward to the day I can do that without a mask.

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

Bertman: Go back to the clubs and have fun all together. 

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

Bertman: Music will never abandon us, especially in difficult moments. I LOVE MUSIC, I LOVE TECHNO!

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

We thank KØZLØV for taking the time out of his busy schedule and responding to our questions. Unfortunately, he did not have the time to spoil us with a set, which doesn’t affect our love for his work. 🥰 We get much energy from his few available sets and love to indulge in the hard-hitting madness of his tracks. Keep an eye out for his upcoming releases and podcasts.

 

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

KØZLØV: Generally, I’m fine, even with this pandemic. However, it’s not easy to maintain a good mood every day. I find some different activities to do and still have a social life. Nowadays, I think it’s vital.

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

KØZLØV: During the first lockdown, it was not so bad because it was something new. After a few weeks and months, you do the same things at home, so you need to be creative and find something else to do. Basically, ‘creativity’ helped a lot. I’m always trying to do something to give myself purpose. We don’t know when the pandemic will stop, so we need to adapt our lives and adopt a new perspective until we return to normal life.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

KØZLØV: What I love about creating music is the surprise you can have when you make it.  For example, with a Digital Audio Workstation (DAW), you would create something in one way. However, in the end, you go in another way, and this feeling is something exciting for me. Sometimes you merely add one instrument, and you can continue your song differently.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

KØZLØV: Definitely not having a social life during the first lockdown. It meant not seeing my friends and family as I normally would.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

KØZLØV: I’ve found that my creativity has no limit. No matter how I feel, I can create music or find something different altogether. For example, going to the gym, learning about electronics or languages … I’m a curious person, and I think I’m thirsty to learn. Ha-ha. 😂

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

KØZLØV: I don’t think an artist inspired me, but I’ve found out about TY, and I really like his music.

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

KØZLØV: My second passion after music, the gym. I’ve been doing that for years, and I never get bored with that.

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

KØZLØV: To travel like a normal person without PCR test everywhere, basically to live as before and not think about how can I go there, or which rules I need to know …

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

KØZLØV: Yes, many people are surprised when I tell them that I’m not only a DJ. I’m also working during the week and will continue to do so because I love my job. I like to find a healthy balance between the week and the weekend. It allows me to maintain sound mental health.

 

Listen to KØZLØV on SoundCloud or Bandcamp.

We thank Vendex for emerging from the underworld, unmasking himself, and giving unconditional support for our project. 🤘🏽 He was on our playlist for the past year, and we were thrilled when we got the opportunity to collaborate. The result is an epic set, which we love to bits, plus our two-hour-long video interview, which is below as an abridged transcription. There is so much to love about his relentless music but what stands out the most to us is his blend of genres and love for dissonance. We are inspired by his energy in producing so much content consistently and taken by his humble personality, ability to share emotional warmth, and willingness to part with his expertise. We are excited about opportunities to collaborate in the future and confident that our shared passion for Italian culture and literature will allow us to introduce Italian techno lovers to one of the best underground artists. 😈🔥

 

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

Vendex: My mood today. I am super happy about being in this interview. I am happy most of the time, but sometimes I feel depressed concerning the overall situation, like being unable to anything. Spain is super restrictive right now, with the curfew at 22:00, bars are only open from lunch to 16:00. These kinds of things are a reminder that you can’t do anything. I can’t work doing the thing I love. One month ago I had to work in a gas company because I need to survive. I earned good money, and now I keep continuing with my work producing podcasts. However, the situation is really crazy, but at the same time, I am happy. I try to stay focused and creative, and that’s what I want to show to people. I want to share happiness with the world since I can see much depression in the world right now. Right now, I am happy.

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

Vendex: We didn’t expect all that. In the beginning, I was like, what is going on. Ok, we stay at home to ensure we safe lives and not contribute to the spread. During the first lockdown, I was ok, since I was working. It became worse later when I realised that I can leave the house, but there is nothing to do. You can only go to work, and that’s about it. Politicians also came up with contradictory rules concerning what you can do and what you can’t do. It is ok that the Metro is full of people going to work, but you can’t go to a nightclub. All these things destroyed my mental health. It felt like the government is taking the piss at all the people working in the nightlife, like in bars, restaurants, and hotels. Like, are you serious? Anyhow, it’s complicated, but I always have hope. I mean, sometimes, I feel low because I want to work or party, but I keep my hopes up and think that it will be very soon. Until then, I keep working from home. I am patient.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

Vendex: It allows me to express my ideas, what I want to represent, what I like to combine. For example, I want to merge metal and techno. I always was a metalhead and previously a singer of a deathcore band. This kind of creativity is possible with music but in other areas as well. My aim is to combine literature, history, occultism, necromancy with my music and stage persona Vendex. Vendex is filled with tropes from Dante Alighieri’s Divina Commedia. It is what I love. I went to university, am a historian. It is my passion, art, literature, and techno. I can combine all of these things. It’s what I want to do most and what I want to create.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

Vendex: The inability for us as an industry, as artists, not working is the harshest for me. My biggest fear was that I will run out of creativity since I cannot expose myself to new stimuli. I need to watch a lot of my favourite series and read books I like or video play games. I was worried this could be the end of Vendex because of not having new inspiration, being subjected to lockdown rules, and only stay at home or work. Anyhow, now, I can outside a little bit more, but before, I was desperate.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

Vendex: I was surprised about my resilience. That I turned into a super creative person despite the lockdown. I noticed many artists stopped working. They are not producing, feel depressed, and stopped altogether. I can survive mentally until we are allowed to go outside again. I didn’t expect that my mental health remains mostly unaffected in this situation. I do have periods in which I feel down, but I never crashed completely. Another variable is that I started this project when I was fourteen, and it was always my focus. I think it might be the motivation for my future and the projects that keep me going. I don’t care, one year, two years, I don’t care, I keep working in lockdown. There is no point in looking back. I just keep looking forward. Having said all that, the situation is challenging.

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

Vendex: I love Dax J. In the past, I got much inspiration from him, and I Hate Models, but now, not as much as I used to but sometimes. However, nowadays, it is rare that I get inspired by others. Before, I was focused on him and some others, but now, I get inspired by various metal bands. I listen more to metal now than I do to techno. Also, I work with and collaborate with people and get inspiration from them, either directly or indirectly.

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

Vendex: I am a freak, and I like playing videogames. I was super excited for Cyberpunk 2077 but was disappointed when it came out. I was thinking, what the fuck did they sell me? It felt like a scam. The game was not only buggy but also did not come with the gameplay mechanics they promised. They said that they would include plenty of features but ended up putting in only twenty per cent or so. Other publishers have similar issues, releasing games too early and fucking up. Anyhow, I love role-playing games like the Witcher, Skyrim, Cyberpunk, Fallout.

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

Vendex: I want to play in every country, in every nightclub, festival. I want to rave non-stop. I will enjoy the little things in life, like going to work without a fucking mask. Go to restaurants, bars, whatever I want. I am going to enjoy everything.

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

Vendex: First, I want to address the artists. It’s going to be hard, but we are looking at the end of the pandemic. Keep working and stay active because if you procrastinate, you’re gone from the market. Keep working. It’s the only thing we can do right now. Second, I like to appeal to the ravers. Stay strong and do small sensible parties. If the system fucks you, fuck the system, really, fuck them. Now we are starting to have vaccines. The elderly are vaccinated. Go to raves, do illegal raves, enjoy the true techno spirit. I don’t care if I die raving. At least I die happy. I am sure this will trigger a lot of people, but I don’t care. People! Go to houses and organise small raves, small events responsibly. I reckon soon we will be back to normal. Third, this applies to everyone. Myself, I take no drugs apart from techno, and I am going to rave like crazy. But I like people who like to indulge in drugs like alcohol, MDMA, and others to take it easy. Please, guys, rave as fuck but be careful. Take your drugs, but do them responsibly. I don’t want to lose decent people to shitty decisions.

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

We thank HeizÖL for making the time to record this podcast and take our call for the interview. His sets have been part of our work playlist since the beginning of 2021, and we couldn’t do without them. We fell as much in love with his sound as we did with his attitude to the culture he is part of creating. He represents a new generation of artists revitalising the German underground techno scene with hard-hitting, driving, dark sounds. Behind his music stands the idea that techno provides an inclusive, non-judgmental, non-commercial, and safe space for everyone. ✊🏽 He is also part of Dopaminmangel/0815 Techno, which promotes artist from all over Germany. We hope you enjoy this set as much as we do. ♥️

 

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

HeizÖL: My mood today is like on most days, great. I don’t let anything get me down. I am a person that is generally in a positive mindset. It’s not easy to get me down, and that’s why I tend to be in a good mood.

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

HeizÖL: To be honest, everyday life has changed little for me. I was able to work as before. My hours weren’t cut, and there were no restrictions. Not being able to meet with friends is one issue. However, apart from that, I was able to live my life relatively unaffected.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

HeizÖL: I can live out my fantasies, the things I imagine musically. I feel connected with everything when I stand behind the equipment. I feel every beat. The music flows through my body, and I have tunnel vision. It fulfils me.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

HeizÖL: Social distancing, that’s not my thing. I like being close to people. Having to wear a mask and things, I don’t fancy that at all.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

HeizÖL: Sharing time with the person you love most is vital. It’s something that needs to be appreciated since we’re working full-time and seeing each other little. Since the lockdown, we spent many weekends together and spending time together is something we must not lose track of.

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

HeizÖL: Most inspired? Not really, if I am honest. I motivate myself. I have this urge to create musically new things, and I already made some tracks. It is something I can realise myself with. Always something new, going further and further.

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

HeizÖL: Do-it-yourself work around the house – bringing everything up to date. Well, suddenly, there was more time and disposable income for it – the most beautiful side project.

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

HeizÖL: The thing I look forward to most is being able to mingle with others. Like visiting a beer garden for a beer, enjoying the sun and talking to people without a mask or social distancing measures. That is something I miss a lot. In general, us finding a way back to normality. I would also like to meet on the street with three of my friends without being looked at like we’re dangerous criminals.

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

HeizÖL: Techno has become somewhat commercial again. I wish this is not the case. Many clubs had to close. After all, they can’t afford the headliners anymore because they are that expensive. It’s an issue that not only affects the techno community but electronic music in general. People like David Guetta make a fortune each gig. It’s obscene. Even worse, he doesn’t play properly. He merely lets some tracks run on autoplay. That’s it. It would be nice if we can return to techno for the love of music and not money or to make a mark for ourselves, that’s something I would appreciate.

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

WNDRLST has dominated our playlist for the past two years. Few people get us going as he does. His dark, all-encompassing, and rich sound give our headphone amps and headphones the workout they deserve. 🎧 He will be part of the first event in a series that we have planned. We thank him for recording the set and taking the time to respond to our questions, sharing with us what moved him over the past few weeks.

 

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

WNDRLST: I am doing great. The weather is slowly getting better and warmer, and me being a summer person is affecting me positively. Also, now that there seems to be some light at the end of the tunnel regarding the pandemic, I slowly gain back more motivation and inspiration for music.

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

WNDRLST: At the very beginning, it honestly did not affect me all that much. Of course, there was a short period where everything seemed more dramatic than it actually is, which was worrisome somehow. However, as time went by, that disappeared quickly. The actual effects for me happened somewhere around November/December 2020. My inspiration dropped significantly, and I struggled a lot more to finish new music. On the upside, I think it mostly had a positive effect on me in general. I spent more time with my friends, which was necessary for me as I moved to Hungary around June this year. Aside from that, I also believe it made me value the everyday things that we can do in our regular daily life a lot more now that we see how easily the things we are most used to can be taken away from us.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

WNDRLST: The way I work with producing is basically with a completely blank mind, messing around until I find something that triggers something in me which is totally dependent on the mood I happen to be in – which is one of the main reasons why my spectrum of releases is quite extensive ranging from more emotional tracks to industrial (which by the way I would not describe as aggressive but powerful). Once the project is starting to take shape, I can usually finish the track within hours. That feeling of having such a smooth and easy workflow is, for me, one of the things I love most about producing music. This, however, also goes totally paired with then releasing it, receiving feedback and being able to play it out live in front of a crowd – it’s an almost indescribable feeling to see a crowd love the music I made and that for me never gets old.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

WNDRLST: Not being able to visit my family and friends back in the Netherlands. I haven’t seen them for nearly a year now, which is definitely taking its toll. Also, as previously mentioned, my inspiration and motivation have dropped quite significantly. However, I am doing my best to find new ways to help me put out new music.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

WNDRLST: To be more appreciative of the freedom and amount of options we have in our daily lives. I think it’s quite easy to take that for granted but going through a time like this where we have limitations definitely is eye-opening.

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

WNDRLST: Honestly, and this is not meant in any negative way, but no one, really. To be in my most creative mindset, I have to focus on what I do and try not to let myself get influenced by other artists, even when there isn’t a pandemic. However, I am still listening to other artists who are sending me their tracks for promotional purposes!

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

WNDRLST: I had met some great new friends when I moved to Budapest, and have been able to spend quality time with them has been amazing. Also, having been able to explore the city, settling in properly was really nice and chilled. Besides that, I am probably spending way too much time watching series and films on Netflix.

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

WNDRLST: First of all, I will travel back to the Netherlands to see my family and friends. I miss them a lot. Secondly, of course, getting back on the road again and catching up on all the gigs that we all missed so much. Things have still moved forward throughout the pandemic, luckily, and there are some amazing things on the horizon, which I am really eager to announce, but it has to wait for now.

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

WNDRLST: Hang in there. There is light at the end of the tunnel, and we will see each other very soon. ♥️

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

JAPAU has found his way into our playlist in early 2021 by leaving a cheeky comment on a WNDRLST set. Since then, he has dominated our playlist, and his mad sets have given structure to our long workdays. He was the first artist we heard that managed 150 bpm or more without sounding like a lunatic at the peak of his amphetamine binge. His label PA•RA•DO•XON, was one of the first we reached out to, and we are thrilled that he has agreed to contribute to our project. He will be part of the first event in a series that we have planned. We would also like to thank him for always being there for us when we have technical questions, treating us with kindness, and embracing our madness. We hope you enjoy his set as much as we do. 🔥😈♥️⛓

 

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

JAPAU: I’m stressed out today because of my work, and every Thursday, I also go to evening school.

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

JAPAU: Truly, I would say I’m getting steadily more unhappy, and it’s not getting better.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

JAPAU: The feeling that I can do whatever I want and let my feelings run free.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

JAPAU: That I couldn’t visit my family during Christmas time, every year I visit my parents, but last year I couldn’t, this was shit. Also, my friends and I couldn’t meet each other in bigger groups.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

JAPAU: I don’t have something in mind when you are asking me this.

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

JAPAU: I don’t have a special artist in mind, but I would say producer’s and DJ’s from France inspired me the most.

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

JAPAU: Graphic design.

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

JAPAU: When the pandemic is over, I take my crew and rush to the next club to have a good time.

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

JAPAU: I appreciate my little community very much. I can’t stop to thank you all for your comments and direct messages.

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

We have been sitting on this release for several weeks and are incredibly excited to share this set with everyone. Åsger is a young talent from Greece who has our attention for quite some while and has released several high-energy sets and tracks since. He will also be one of the artists we will collaborate with on our live events planned once the pandemic is under control. Thank you for taking the time to contribute to this collaboration, a big hug and kiss from Italy, and massive thanks for bringing us some raw Thessaloniki underground techno. 🤗😘🔥😈

 

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

åsger: I’m feeling great today, full of energy and good vibes.

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

åsger: Since the start of the pandemic in Europe, I have stayed focused on producing music and recording podcast for several projects, so my mental health is excellent. I don’t let anything from the outside affect me.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

åsger: I love the ability to express my feelings through my music, from anger to other emotions – I like to tell a story.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

åsger: Nothing in particular.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

åsger: Due to pandemic-related restrictions, I have started to value people close to me,  family, and good friends more than before.

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

åsger: I have many producers on my mind. However, in the last months, my good friends Kosmâss and Endlec inspired me with their non-stop exploration of music and production skills to do the same.

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

åsger: To be able to go kickboxing, but also to cut wood and construct new things again.

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

åsger: When pandemic is over? There is only one thing in my mind, get back in the clubs and get wasted as fuck.

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

åsger: Music has no boundaries. Stay safe and sound.

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

This week, we present you a unique gem from Paris. 💎 We got to know Substencia and her incredibly dark, spacious, and mature sound through a close friend of ours. The two collaborated recently, Substencia creating the eery track and Dothy Moroders creating a mind-boggling visual experience. Sestra Records released Ice Foxes, and HATE published the video on YouTube. We started listening to her music and were in love with her sound immediately. We are thrilled that she made the time for the interview and creating this playful and well-curated set, and we hope you enjoy it as much as we do. 🪐♥️💫

 

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

Substencia: Great!

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

Substencia: I’ve got a non-music related full-time job, so I have this chance to not be entirely affected by this pandemic. But I must tell that I’ve been through some challenging moments since the beginning of this shit. Taking our freedom, thinking that the governments are deciding what we do when we go out, who we meet … It’s kind of freaky. This kind of thought makes me feel bad (like most people) and sometimes takes my motivation out for anything.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

Substencia: Discover how to undress my feelings, explore my old techno/classical roots and try to express all of this through homemade sounds.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

Substencia: To be honest, not so many things compare to others. I’ve found a new apartment; I released a lot of music … The only thing was maybe not to be able to see friends whenever I wanted.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

Substencia: Nothing specific comes to mind …

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

Substencia: I think I would say Speedy J. Although he is one of my favourite ever for the past 20 years. However, during the pandemic, he launched several concepts with his Stoor project, particularly his show ‘Knob Twiddlers Hangout’. They feature inspiring artists who really talk about music. Then there are the broadcasted live sets, thanks to the Discord technology, which allows broadcasting two streams synchronised at the same time. The last sessions were with Orphx and Surgeon. Both influenced me significant influence for a long time.

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

Substencia: Mostly video games, books, and watching series.

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

Substencia: Immersing myself in a giant wall of sound and celebrate.

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

Substencia: I hope that the techno scene will be more focused on talent, passion, and celebration than business.

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

Another artist, interview, and set that is dear to our heart – over the past few weeks, HLUNKE has become a stable of our daily playlist. What makes this one unique is that we had much time to exchange apart from working towards the actual goals of the collaboration and get to know one another. There are many shared interests but also other things that connect. We are thrilled that we can share this banger of a set. After the pandemic, we really look forward to party with one of the finest German underground techno community. HLUNKE is also part of Dopaminmangel/0815 Techno, which has also grown close to our hearts. Thanks again for all the love and support from the Rhur area, in particular, for the thoughtful interview.

 

HLUNKE: First, dear Lea and Dénis, I like to thank you for the collaboration. I am delighted with every project I can contribute to.

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

HLUNKE: Thank you for asking. Considering we’re in the middle of a pandemic, I first like to mention that I am physically healthy, and I have nothing to complain about. The good weather has a positive effect on my mood. It’s 24 °C in the shade, which makes it challenging to taint my mood. However, unfortunately, it can’t be ruled out totally. In general, I don’t feel as fit as I would on other days. There were some moments where I wasn’t quite there. I can’t say what’s the cause – I think these days just exist. Good ones and bad ones, most people will be familiar with this. 😂

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

HLUNKE: I can’t say how everyone defines ‘mental health’, but if we’re talking about non-physical one, I am on the right track answering this question adequately. I would say that the pandemic has not really a massive effect on me. Yes, of course, wearing masks, for example, affects my mood. However, up until now, it’s ok since it’s only mandatory when visiting shops and since I tend to spend little time there, I can somewhat live with it. However, I can’t say for how much longer I will cope with this nonsense – with all due respect to other people’s health. That plays directly in the non-stop exposure to pandemic related topics, the continuous noise of figures or new easing or tightening measures. Radio, newspaper, social media, there is no place free of pandemic related news unless one ventures into the forest. It really is annoying. Plus, people force actions on you and throw out any moral values doing so. I think fear is a significant factor, and I can say that, fortunately, I am mostly not affected, at least from physical health-related worry. However, what the future holds for us is more questionable than ever. I can’t say if there are existential fears, but I am thinking about if there is more to come for us in the future. In summary, the pandemic affects my mood only subtly and to a small extent only. For now, I can deal with the coronavirus related measures and make the best out of them.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

HLUNKE: I can’t really say what I love most when making music. Instead, I think it’s an interplay of many things I love. I can leave everyday stress behind me and create something new, which I love. One of the most remarkable experiences is getting real-time feedback when mixing, which shows me if what I’m doing is good or not. I really enjoy getting feedback from a live audience when mixing to hear how they perceive my music. I love venturing to the unknown to combine things that weren’t connected in this way before. In the end, it doesn’t matter if the mixing or track selection contributed to the overall result. Right now, I am trying myself combining melodies. I am a friend of the exceptional – that is a variable that I enjoy very much and integrate into the music creation process. The community is also crucial. The crowd is one of the most vital parts when making music! What would music without the listener and words without ears? The community creates a unique dynamic that permeates the music of many artists. I am delighted whenever I see how music connects people with one another. They are willing to take certain risks, potentially commit crimes to organise a non-commercial party for the community, solely to improve this day for everyone involved. Techno is and remains a sub-culture that was created from the societies filth and rubbish. The lower class itself has birthed and raised this culture. I feel extreme gratitude for being a part of this culture.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

HLUNKE: The most hurtful thing to witness since the beginning of the pandemic was how people attack and be vicious with one another. One side is scared of and has enormous respect for the virus, trying to protect themselves and their peers from getting infected by preventing people from gathering in large crowds. The other side has little respect and is even less scared and stopped paying attention with whom or how they interact with others. That is where I see the conflict. The fear-driven side demands considerate interactions with other people but has zero tolerance if crowds suddenly arise. Presumably, people who feel their liberty are suddenly constrained, but, maybe, these people in groups want to be respected in the same way as those afraid for their health. However, what does reality really look like? Some people feel so threatened about their health that they become offensive and aggressive. I respect the fear of every person and deal with this consciously. However, I don’t understand how people think it is ok to demand to be treated in a specific way but at the same time believe it is legit to treat others without respect. On the other side, the one that is not scared of the virus and is not necessarily in favour of curfews or social distancing, but still meets with others, they are not even asked about their health. However, these people are affected most by the entire situation, and I think their number is increasing. These people are massively restricted and have to face measures for several months, even a year nearly, but there is zero respect for wearing masks in the city or shopping centre, even if they are not affected by the topic. Instead, the government is reprimanded and fining them. People sacrifice so much and not even get the least amount of attention for their desires and perspectives. That is what the fight versus the pandemic symbolises to me! People have been divided.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

HLUNKE: Ufff, I can’t answer this question precisely. We’re struggling with the pandemic for approximately fifteen months now. I probably have learned more during this period than in my entire life before. I am 28 years now and think we learn so much each year. In theory, we are a totally new person every second year. Well, the pandemic goes on for fifteen to twenty-four months. It could be that people see one another after we’re through and don’t recognise each other anymore. 😜 The most striking I learned about myself was presumably ego related. I was fortunate enough to make two happy and one sad ego-related realisation, which provided me with more clarity. I can do much with these newly learned realisations. I work with and try to include them actively in my development. Furthermore, by reading some books, I learned that my childhood influences my adult life. I am aware of these influences now and can do much with this information to learn more about myself and share with others. I like sharing what I learned with my peers and feel happy if they find it useful. It’s predominantly about interpersonal interactions – the exchange of experiences.

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

HLUNKE: I have several names to give. Lenzeis, TDOC, Neagles, Thor Adam, N997, Melissa D’Lima, Diazepin, Karl Schwarz, A.B.T. (Anti Bio Tikka), RAbbeAT, Chistiano Michaely, Rorganic, TY, Japau, Mandy Ray, Arsen, Parapher, Brutalismus3000, Nuitsible, Hector … and many more. In my case, there are quite a few. I get inspired by many artists. There is always something from an artist that I can adopt. Each one is unique when it comes to mixing or producing music. There were at least 79 situations where I was listening to something like a crazy transition or techno track pattern that got me going and impressed me. Every artist is creative in another way. I think people just need to engage with the matter long enough to create something unique to them. You don’t recognise these things in yourself until late. Still, as an observer, one can identify inspiring hand movements, ideas, or realisations. It only takes sufficient interest and the ability to listen closely. Once these two requirements are met, it surely doesn’t take long, even as laypeople, to get inspired by every artist.

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

HLUNKE: I was lucky enough that mother nature gave me an aptitude for being creative and realising my talent. Ok, it’s not given one-hundred per cent. There is some work involved as well. I was made aware of my creativity on several occasions. People around me know me for it, and, sometimes, my reputation precedes me. I learned to utilise this creativity for art projects. In addition to graffiti, I also focus on tattooing. Graffiti and drawing are both something that I do longer than music. Since the pandemic, my focus is on spraying pictures or drawing templates. In many respects, I compare painting/drawing/spraying with music since there are many overlapping areas. Sometimes I apply the painting approach to the process of making music. Since the pandemic, painting is my favourite activity apart from music. If there were no pandemic, tattooing would also be on the list.

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

HLUNKE: For the past fifteen months, the only thing one hears is incidence figures, infection, mask violations, vaccinations. The term pandemic is the primary focus of reporting and the conversation coronavirus. Genuinely, the thing I am looking forward to the most is not talking about this topic anymore. It is the topic that seems to trigger me the most. You can’t go anywhere without having to talk about this topic first. It doesn’t matter if it is at my customer service work, news outlets, social media, parents, close relatives – nowhere is safe anymore. 🤣 In any case, I look forward to meeting new people, make contacts, attend events, and go fucking wild. I am sure this question often gets a similar response 😂 since everyone longs for normality. Many people, in particular, the rave community, wants to meet and dance in an ecstatic state. I miss this unimaginably, as organiser, artist, and guest. 😊

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

HLUNKE: I thank every listener and follower of our and my projects and feel grateful for the support. It is crucial to stick together – support one another. Times can be even more challenging. Love goes to everyone out there. I also like to thank Lea and Dénis for this collaboration opportunity and be part of this project. That’s it. I wish you only the best. With kind regards from the heart of the Ruhr area. HLUNKE79 aka Niklas

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

We have to say, ten out of ten, no question, the funniest interview we had. Jason and Tim got our attention at the very start of our project, and we love their dark and room-filling sound. The interview gave us a detailed and honest insight into what makes up TRUXX, and we love it. They are two incredibly witty, hard-working, and talented artists with big hearts. The interview also made us reminiscent of our university time in Maastricht. Thus, we look forward to the post-pandemic days where the two will spoil us to some of the wildest Amsterdam house parties. We hope you will enjoy the set, and please make sure to check out the interview to brighten up your day.

 

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

Jason: Eight out of ten, I am pretty satisfied. I think primarily because I was outside today. I am working all day from home at the same spot we have this interview right now. I think I spent around eighty per cent of my time during the week I am here, so being outside felt great. I went to Amsterdam centre by train, and I went to an island by boat, which felt really lovely, so a solid eight out of ten from me. 😄

Tim: My whole day was a four out of ten. I didn’t like my work today, I was annoyed at everything, but now it is a solid ten out of ten because now I am doing the music thing, and that is what I like. Working in a shop, Nah, that’s not it. I need to earn some money, but I don’t do it because I want it. During the day I was bored, but now I feel happy.

Jason: I would like to change my score to a ten because I am doing an interview with an Irish guy who lives in Italy. That’s awesome.

Tim: It’s eleven. Let’s call it eleven out of ten for this moment.

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

Jason: I think in the first month or two, like March 2020, I was super excited. ‘Yes, I am going to work from home, the best thing ever. In April, I had a few rough days, just sitting here and doing my work. At some stages, I was just staring out of the window and thinking, ‘What the hell am I doing. I was asking myself if I don’t do this job, would anything change? I did not really see the purpose of my work, what I was doing. I had some down days after that, but since the summer, I got used to working from home, just doing my thing, getting into a flow. I also had to learn how to allocate time for work and personal shit, so I just stopped working at 17:00. I just stopped, even if there was still something left to do. I can do this tomorrow. A few months back, I thought my work doesn’t matter, and now, it still doesn’t matter. 😂 So, the first few months were hard, but after that, I got my vibe going, and it wasn’t that bad. We still had plenty of time to see one another and other friends. It wasn’t that bad.

Tim: When the pandemic started, I worked at the airport, at a car rental. However, flights soon stopped, and I lost my job, it was hard, and I was afraid I wouldn’t get another job, but after one month, I found a new one. After that, it was fine. At the beginning of the pandemic, I was still able to play field hockey, go to the gym, but now I feel bored a little. I don’t really like my job, it’s okay, but I don’t get a lot of energy. Now, it’s beginning to get a little bit more open, so I can play hockey again, but the last three month’s I didn’t play hockey, I didn’t go to the gym. Going to the Radio, where we have a weekly show, was the highlight of the week. The rest of the days, we’re boring, work, home, work, home, work home. Every day was just the same, tedious, repetitive.

Jason: The pandemic was also a wake-up call to focus on our studies as sound engineers next year. I am not sure if I would have gone for it if life would have been normal.

Tim: Yes, exactly. During the pandemic, we got our own radio show. As mentioned, when the pandemic started, I was employed at the airport, which required me to work shifts at different times of the day. Still, now my work is during regular office hours, which allows me to do the radio show. Because I am bored, I have time to contemplate and think, ‘Is this the job I want to do the rest of my life?’, and it is a big no. It opened my eyes to do something else. I look forward to doing something I really like, and that’s making music.

Jason: I think it’s a solid ten out of ten again.

Tim: Life itself during the pandemic is boring, but I look forward to the future.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

Jason: Getting my vibe out, getting my creative mind to do something out of my head. Since I can’t really draw and really love techno, it was easy to use music to express my creativity. Right now, I love most about techno when I can use a sequencer and create strange alien-like sounds, pressing randomly on the sequencer, again and again, until something pops out. I just love it. Getting a trance vibe, a kick, 136 bpm, just go for it, and when I sit there, bumping with my head, that’s the moment when I know it’s good. The most important thing for me is not knowing what I make when I start until I get something and start bumping my head. That’s when I am happy with my life.

Tim: I think the same applies to me. I also like the freedom. I am not limited by someone telling me what I can or cannot do. Instead, I can do whatever I want, 160 bpm, I can do that, if I want strange sounds, I can do that. I am making my own music.

Jason: Yes, doing what you want to do is also a good part of making music.

Tim: As long as it sounds good and people like it, even if it is just a single person who likes your sound, it’s good enough for me. It’s also grand if you’re the only person happy with it. In the end, you make the music for yourself, and if people like the music you like yourself, then everything is good.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

Jason: The future, as mentioned before, during the second month of the pandemic, I felt down, not really knowing what to do with my work. I still don’t know what to do workwise, but less now since I decided to study becoming a sound engineer next year. Coincidently, this morning I talked to my boss, requesting to work fewer hours. They agreed and were supportive of it. What was the question again? 😂

Tim: 😂🤣

Jason: It’s all ten out of ten, a solid ten. 😂 I was worried that I would not have a decent future ahead of me since I don’t want to continue with the work I’m currently doing. Some days, everything is okay. You work with colleagues, you work with people, you see them on the screen. However, sometimes they’re many appointments, and I’m just sitting here, watching the screen, and I don’t feel anything about it. There is no passion for the work being done. Working in the music industry, it doesn’t really matter what I’m working at. There is a motivation, doing something you love, something close to you, that also helps other people. I think I struggled most with having a job that does not mean much to me. That doesn’t seem to pursue a goal.

Tim: It’s similar for me. I like electronics, that’s why I choose to work in an electronics store. I just don’t care about other people’s opinion, like when they complain after having bought a television, and delivery takes two days longer. What the hell, it’s about television, they can wait two days. You can’t tell them and must be nice to them that everything will be fine. 😵‍💫 I don’t like people complaining about useless stuff. I can deal with one person complaining, but yeah, that’s just a bit much when five do it in a row. It’s just a waste of time. Anyhow, that’s the biggest struggle I must deal with in my job.

Jason: In everyday life, there are so many distractions. You get distracted by the thought that you don’t want to do this for the rest of your life.

Tim: Exactly.

Jason: There are many things I like to do besides my job.

Tim: Before the pandemic, you just worked, went home, meet with a friend to eat out, go to a bar, club, or the beach, but now, it’s just staying home, watching television, drink some beer, and thinking about how bored I am. I don’t want to live another 80 boring years like this.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

Jason: (Pauses) Yes, the epiphany of wanting to something different with my life. I think that’s it. I had time to think about life and make a decision that makes you happy instead of merely trying to make you happy.

Tim: It’s the same for me. (Talking Dutch) It’s about political choices. It’s about life, what is life for people. People are struggling with the consequences of the pandemic all around the world, and most countries are lacking any fucking sense. They are much poorer off, like countries in South America or the African continent. It’s strange since, to me, everybody is the same, but that’s not how the world is treating one another. Things are incredibly unfair around the globe. Nature and our environment are treated poorly. The pandemic has opened my eyes to the current state of the world and how things need to change. I had more time to think about things instead of doing stuff, and we need to change. It’s just the way things are currently organised.

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

Jason: Maybe not inspired, but it is the artists I was listening to the most and enjoying his fantastic tutorials – Yan Cook. 😂

Tim: Yan Cook, I would have guessed that. 😂

Jason: He is a Ukrainian guy. I think he only does live sets. It’s dark and fast pounding techno and bleak. When I listen to it, I imagine I should be in a Berlin basement six stories underground.

Tim: I don’t think I have one artist that inspired me the most. I think it’s more like a vibe. A similar vibe to the podcast we created for you guys. It’s not fast and heavy techno, but dark, bleak, and strange baselines that change a little, but more minimal dark techno. Not one artist but a sound style.

Jason: I think there are also one or two Yan Cook tracks in the mix. They are coming at a later stage, during the faster part.

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

Jason: (Silence) I think, being together with friends, just socialising with people. I mean, we see each other often, sometimes it’s just the gang together on a Sunday, having dinner together at someone’s home, and I look around and think to myself ‘This is nice’. It’s just happy with each other. I just sit right here (pointing on the chair he sits on) and work. 😂

Tim: 😂

Jason: I think it’s nice because my girlfriend is also living here, and it’s nice to have someone around. Just going out with your friends, being together, having a laugh. I think that is the thing I enjoyed the most, besides music.

Tim: It’s the same for me. Apart from music, I like gaming, but I enjoyed gaming before the pandemic, which hasn’t changed. Before the pandemic, going out with friend was part of everyday life, but now, I realised, going out is not something that we can take for granted. Now we must follow the curfew, and going out with friends are the highlights of the pandemic.

Jason: We started to appreciate it more.

Tim: Exactly, we much more appreciate the time we have outside. That’s the good part.

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

Jason: The first thing that comes to mind. Last year, we bought tickets for Awakenings.

Tim: 😁

Jason: I just want to be there, on a fucking massive festival. I don’t care if it is commercial or whatever. I just want to be there and go fucking mental, listen to whatever artists are playing.

Tim: I also want to go out and do the thing I like to do without being restricted like we are now. Suppose I came home from work and decided to go to a restaurant. In that case, I will be delighted to do that without thinking of the pandemic related restrictions.

Jason: The simple things in life. 😄

Tim: Yes, the simple things in life. 😄 Basic things, like just being able to go to the gym without thinking about if I can or not, without having to check the schedule if they are full or not, having to wait for two days. Nah. 😣 I don’t like having things complicated. I just want to be able to go straight to the gym if I feel like it.

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

Jason: 😂 Follow us on SoundCloud.

Tim: 🤣

Jason: Oh yes, buy our demo, €20, special price just for you. Ten out of ten. 🙌🏽 Rated by two people. 😂

Tim: Listen to our radio show (Dutch only). 😁

Jason: Once we can come together again, appreciate each other more. I think most people on festivals are doing so, being on MDMA or whatever. Besides that, I don’t really have an emotional message for everyone now. 😂

Tim: Just enjoy the music. Look beyond the top ten techno artists. Go to festivals and listen to artists you don’t know and see if you like it. Most music that people are remarkable in one way or another, but not many people are aware of them. If you can listen to unknown people, do so, sometimes it can be mind-blowing. Maybe you don’t like it, but at least you tried. Going to see the same artist all the time is boring as hell, it’s always the same, and they all play each other’s music, so every set will be the same. Go the experimental way and check out people you haven’t seen before. This way, you might enjoy partying even more.

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

We’re incredibly thrilled that we can present you this week’s set and interview today. We love Metaraph on many levels, the performance art, but foremost, the incredible music that has us going. Everything Metaraph does, emits anti-establishment but also a deep love for the arts. It felt easy to identify with Metaraph since we also don’t like to be labelled by gender roles. We want to be treated as persons and wish to be measured by our behaviours. Let us challenge the status quo together. ✊🏽 We hope you will enjoy this madness of a set and thoughtful interview as much as we do. Thanks again, Metaraph, for taking the time out of your busy schedule to provide us with both. A big hug and kiss from the two of us. 🤗😘

 

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

Metaraph: My mood today is very energised, motivated and smooth. Happy ☺️

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

Metaraph: At first, back in March 2020, the pandemic has impacted my mental health for the first two-to-four weeks, making me anxious and worried. I guess most of us reacted at the beginning. I lived with other six incredible and sweet people who are one of the central core of people close to me in London(when I use to live there). We all decided to entertain each other with different artistic workshops, live-streamed performances as a group together, and much more, which really helped my mental health stay sane and motivated throughout the lockdown.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

Metaraph: I love making music because it is a way to create a very introspective and emotional journey that takes the listeners from within, beyond touching our unconsciousness in different personal ways. I love making music because of its transcendental and healing powers, creating a sonic journey that can make you forget everything and brings you to other places, memories, visions, and altered states of mind.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

Metaraph: To be honest, the main struggle has been missing the whole social aspect of life, play music in front of a real crowd, going out with friends for a simple coffee, et cetera. Also, economically has been very difficult to keep trying to survive and paying the bills because all my different practises and incomes have been affected by the pandemic to different degrees.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

Metaraph: I’m actually blessed and grateful for the whole pandemic, in a way. Even if we lost a lot from our previous way to leave life, this has offered more time for different things that I wanted to do but did not have time for, taking care of my body and starting to exercise, have fewer gigs brought me to have more time to focus on music production, I’ve also begun to experiment with mixed media paintings which then is going to be integrated within my other practises, I also decided to move out of the country and finally move to Berlin. I’ve learned even more how to be grateful for the most minor things in life. I think that this was also needed for humanity to appreciate more and take less for granted!

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

Metaraph: It’s hard to name just one considering that it has been over a year already, but surely PLEXOS, Somniac one, Xanah, Hashtaga, Neurocore, Dance Divine and more.

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

Metaraph: Apart from music, I’ve been working on the new collection for my jewellery brand, been exploring new visual arts series, been training again and doing some contemporary dance projects, a few live streaming performances, physical activities, and yoga.

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

Metaraph: Post-covid I’m looking forward to playing for a real crowd, going out with friends, sharing meals and have fun. Starting to travel again, go to exhibitions, do live performances, and meet more people from Berlin’s queer community.

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

Metaraph: We will not be free until ALL of us are free!

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

We came across Ayako’s Music recently, one of her Gegen sets, and were taken by it immediately. We learned that we lived in Ireland during the same time and also in Germany, Aachen. Thus, it is surprising that we never crossed paths in the past. 😂 We’re thrilled when she agreed to collaborate on our project since there is so much to love about Ayako’s music. She notably won our hearts when we learned how much time and energy she puts in promoting emerging artists and how heavily she is involved in the queer scene. Did we mention how brilliant her tracks and sets are? 😜 We can’t wait to hear her perform live and marvel at her concentrated face, and maybe glimpsing a nod towards her CDJ when the machine does what she intended it to do. Thank you, Ayako, for the incredibly well-curated set and thoughtful interview.

 

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

Ayako Mori: Recently, my mental health is stable because of spring – the number of daylight hours is enough for me in spring.

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

Ayako Mori: My anxiety about my future has increased a bit.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

Ayako Mori: It’s not in Creating time. When I see the people like my music a lot, or other artists played my tracks, I feel happy the most. 😊 That’s why I keep creating music for people to dance to. 😄

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

Ayako Mori: In the beginning, I was ok because I expected that it would not last that long. I loved spending time in my room, allowing me to have more time for producing new music. I was fortunate enough to play at some open-air parties and live streams that I wanted to play and make new friends there. I was lucky this winter because I had three months off work because of the lockdown. The daylight hours during winter in Germany, Poland, and Ireland are too short for me. Thus, my winter Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) was heavy. It was excruciating trying to live like an ordinary person. In March, the German Government changed Coronavirus regulations, causing me stress since you can’t go to a clothes shop without a test. I had plans to travel for live streaming events. A few offers for gigs from countries that had fewer restrictions and were allowed to organise parties. However, right now, I cannot confirm anything since everything is still uncertain. Playing my sets at parties gives me pleasure, but I could not do that, so it stressed me.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

Ayako Mori: I always thought that I wanted to improve my music. Now that I got free time, I started watching tutorial movies. 😂

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

Ayako Mori:

  • Dana Montana | EXHALE Together Live Stream
  • XiK | GEGEN KitKatClub live stream
  • Mar/us | United We Stream #39 – GEGEN x KitKatClub
  • Metaraph | DURCH x HÖR [6 Feb 2021]
  • Raul Alvarez | The Symphony For The Revolution
  • Johnny Piras | Polizeiklang
  • Raul Alvarez | Phoenix Howls – Delta (δ) – ASMR BINAURAL RITUAL

 

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

Ayako Mori: It’s the same as it was before the pandemic. I love spending time with my good friends. 😊

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

Ayako Mori: Playing at a techno party! ❤️‍🔥

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

Ayako Mori:

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

Last month, we had the pleasure to meet Lady Maru in Roma for a walk and briefly got to know one another. We have incredible respect for her energy and find it easy to connect to her many art projects. She defines what underground is, and we share the same love for the punk lifestyle and anarchist outlook on life. She is pushing the auditory boundaries like few people do, and we’re absolutely in love with the madness she creates. We thank her for the time she took to respond to the questions and energy she put into making this gem of a set. It is probably enjoyed best on a proper sound system or decently amped headphones. A hug from both of us, and we hope to collaborate again soon. 🤗

 

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

Lady Maru: Today, I am in an everyday mood – no particular fears nor anxiety.

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

Lady Maru: It has been tough initially because we didn’t know what was going on. Then again, this fall, when they closed everything for the second time, it was horrible. Now we are scared of getting the virus just before the vaccine is coming. It is an absolute nightmare.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

Lady Maru: Creating music has been my main activity for almost twenty years. I like to do it more with a friend, but I’m also happy even when I finish a track alone. I must create something that has a central importance in my life.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

Lady Maru: I struggled for freedom and constitutional rights, and I am still fighting for that. Then there were the money issues. Personally, I had to apply many skills to get recognition from the Italian government. I didn’t get any money till June. It has been absolute hell before seeing a small light. Plus, I was supposed to get back to Berlin, and I couldn’t go back and forth as planned for apparent reasons.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

Lady Maru: I learned to go home earlier, wake up earlier, and organise all the work (music and bureaucracy). I did a lot of bureaucracy. Things I haven’t done before, and I learnt how to spend time not fearing the many restrictions and mental obsessions.

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

Lady Maru: I have been working a lot with a visual artist friend. We did an album and a project band together, ‘Brutal Casual Magazine’. I had time to listen to many records of new and old genres, from EBM to Exotica.

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

Lady Maru: I have been jogging and walking every day, as usual, but of course, way more because of the pandemic. I discovered my city, Rome, since I had way more time to walk freely when we were not in a red zone.

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

Lady Maru: I’d like to visit other places like everybody else and start socialising and partying again without having paranoid thoughts.

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

Lady Maru: When it starts again, it will be vital for me to stick to the quality of music, meaning its sense and contents. That means more content, less technique and less fashion. This is my wish.

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

We are in love with Jorge’s and Nathan’s entrepreneurial approach and attention to detail. Within a few months, TEGRON has created significant presence in the underground techno scene. They are also co-founder of the Phobia Project, which promotes the darker side of techno. We enjoy every minute in contact with them and look forward to hearing them live in Europe or maybe get a flight to Brazil once the pandemic allows. Thanks again for your contributions to the techno community. ❤️‍🔥😈 We are grateful for the two taking the time to respond to our questions and create this banger of a set – a massive hug from the two of us. 🤗😘

 

TEGRON: Hello Dénis and Lea. First of all, thank you very much for the opportunity. We are delighted to participate in your project!

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

TEGRON: Our moods have been very varied during this period of the pandemic. We have been experiencing sudden mood swings for short periods.

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

TEGRON: The pandemic acted like a bucket of cold water in a highly frustrating way, with several situations going very well (gigs, partnerships, events held by the nucleus that we are co-founders – Phobia Project, et cetera). Because of this, in the first thirty days, our feeling was denial. We believed that everything would be resolved within a few weeks, but, after the first month, we concluded how serious this situation was. The first action we had was to stay calm to focus our energy on what really matters. Because of this, our musical project TEGRON has become our primary refuge and pleasure, giving us focus and strength in this awful period. We discovered that our passion for music and its surroundings was much more significant than we initially imagined during this phase. In addition to dedicating a good part of the day to developing our project’s relationship with labels, other artists, producers, and groups worldwide, we also started the music production course to launch our own tracks later this year. We also changed our entire presentation setup, investing a lot of work, money, and effort. All this due to having complete certainty that this is what really moves us. It is our absolute goal/dream.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

TEGRON: Music allows us to express our whole concept. Everything we have inside us, and we want to pass it on to the world, present it to everyone. This is what we love the most in this creative process. We communicate in a universal language, where regardless of any belief/origin/culture, the individual can understand what the message is being conveyed directly. It is fantastic. It is something that really moves us!

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

TEGRON: Our primary focus has been on our project during the pandemic. We are fighting for its recognition/visibility in an incredibly demanding and universal scene. The aim is for us to use this pandemic to produce quality content and reach various places globally. Before the pandemic, it was somewhat ‘difficult’ because we didn’t spend that much time inside our homes. TEGRON has made us keep our minds very busy and focused. It has helped us a lot to go through this very troubled period worldwide (mainly in Brazil, where everything is being done in the worst possible way by our president).

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

TEGRON: The pandemic has given us time to look at ourselves, find out who we really are, what we want, and where we want to go. We learn what to focus on, get involved with, invest time, money, and energy. Thanks to this, we have been immensely involved with the TEGRON project. After analysing ourselves, we identified all the value and passion we have for it. We also recognised a great passion for fashion. Thus, together with other founders, we developed the Phobia Project nucleus, the Phobia Skin brand, aimed at the clubber audience. It is really amazing to be able to look inside and discover all this. This is one of the few positive points that this whole situation has brought us.

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

TEGRON: Indeed, the two artists who most inspired us at that moment were Rebekah and SPFDJ. We are very fans of the work they develop in different areas, not only in music.

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

TEGRON: Staying with our friends at home. This isolation also brought the appreciation that we have to give to moments with people we like. Before this all happened, we had it in a very accessible way, but we didn’t give it much value because we didn’t know what it would be like to lose – until the time we lost it.

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

TEGRON: For sure, a VERY hectic social life, LOTS of parties, LOTS of gigs, LOTS of time away from home! 😂🤣 We believe that everyone is thinking in this way. We have been deprived of a very precious asset, which is freedom. We are in contact with several centres that intend to return with the parties immediately after the vaccination (including ours), which is excellent! I think that in addition to art has taken a great place of prominence as an enhancement, the electronic music scene has returned with a powerful force, and we will certainly reach a larger space worldwide.

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

TEGRON: Techno is our passion, and thanks to it, we have been working tirelessly day after day. We want most to recognise, appreciate, and space that all this incredible culture has to offer.

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

This week’s set contribution from a young Canadian artist. Thank you, TECHJEß, for taking the time for the interview and this banger of a set.

 

TECHJEß: Hello Dénis and Lea, thank you again for the opportunity to collaborate with your project! It was mainly a treat because I feel I haven’t talked about my mental health in a while, so thank you for letting me open up! Below are the answers to the questions in order.

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

TECHJEß: My mood is excellent! Way better than what was in the Wintertime when we had snow. But the vibe here changed once Spring arrived, and so did my headspace! Feeling much better than a few months ago.

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

TECHJEß: While living in Berlin on a visa for half of the pandemic, my mental health stayed great because it was the first time I was free from working and had time to explore a new country and cities close by before returning to Canada. When everything paused in Berlin, everyone made sure to bring their speakers to the park or on the streets to dance and enjoy life. Sadly when I had to move back to Canada, it was clear the quality of life was sucked out of most people here, which took a toll on my mental health for a short time until I picked up music again and remembered what I love most in life.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

TECHJEß: The satisfaction of ‘wow, I made that?’ is exhilarating and having tunnel vision for the future. Every performer creates a dream to perform live, and that’s why I love creating right now during the pandemic, as it’s preparing me for the future once this slows down.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

TECHJEß: I was living in Germany for a year where the pandemic really didn’t take a toll on people enjoying life. I’ve been telling myself, “I’m dying to be back in Berlin,” but I know it’s not the time just yet. I just miss what I once had just a few months ago regarding social life and quality of life.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

TECHJEß: I graduated in public relations, and I never incorporated it into my life until I kick-started my DJ career this past year. I’ve learned that I have the confidence to brand and pitch myself to labels and to not be afraid to share my sound with the World.

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

TECHJEß: Paul Kalkbrenner and Rebekah are two class acts that have inspired me for the past year. Paul shares his cool, edgy look on life in his recent studio sessions on YouTube. Rebekah has had many important messages this past year that need to be shared regarding drugs, abuse, and other sensitive but accurate issues.

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

TECHJEß: RuPaul’s Drag Race keeps me on my toes every week. When a season ends, a new season starts, whether it be an international or an all-stars season. It’s definitely the one show that adds a tremendous amount of happiness to my life every week!

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

TECHJEß: Moving back to Berlin! September 2022 is the planned return date. It might not be over by then, but hopefully, it will be slowed down enough for my return. I’m ready to rave again!

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

TECHJEß: Although it feels like our dancefloors are gone, for now, the love for techno remains so strong. You can see it in the techno community every day, still greatly thriving. Don’t worry. Once this is all over, our industry will be booming again. 😈 Stay positive and keep working hard!

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

This week’s set is another one dear to our hearts. The first time we heard Wrong Assessment was in 2018 in Bologna, where he was playing an incredibly energetic and hypnotic closing set. Since then, we are deeply in love with his unique skill to create all-encompassing and driving sounds that have a gentle and never-ending seeming flow. We can’t wait to hear him in the wild again. Thank you for taking the time to record this beautiful set for us and respond to the questions. We send you all the best wishes to Milano.

 

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

Wrong Assessment: Feeling good 😊

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

Wrong Assessment: I think it didn’t really affect it.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

Wrong Assessment: I am expressing myself through an alternative language.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

Wrong Assessment: The fact that I couldn’t leave my house freely for so long due to restrictions.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

Wrong Assessment: Nothing special related to the pandemic.

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

Wrong Assessment: Temudo.

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

Wrong Assessment: Cooking, studying, meeting friends.

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

Wrong Assessment: It seems to be kind of over, and I’m happy I can leave my house without any restrictions now.

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

Wrong Assessment: Don’t believe the hype. Support your own favourites! 😊

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

We have been looking forward to this set very-fucking-much. We came across BEHEĀDER’s music only recently, but it was love at the first sound. Few people in the past decade grabbed our attention so violently yet gently. Each track of his seems a love letter to what extend human perception can be fucked with. Most importantly, his music makes us smile. We also had the opportunity to chat and discovered an incredibly talented, thoughtful, kind, and kinky human being. 😈 We’re extremely grateful for his contribution to our project. We hope you will enjoy his mental set and the interview as much as we do. A big hug and kiss from both of us. 🤗😘 We can’t wait to see your basement.

 

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

BEHEĀDER: Feeling a little exhausted because I got a lot of stuff going on but pretty happy overall.

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

BEHEĀDER: It was an up and down. On the one hand, the isolation and missing parties/social events made me feel lonely and lost. On the other hand, it helped me get clear-minded and focus on how I want to spend my time and what goals I want to reach in the future. Spending so much at home with my flatmate definitely made both of us way crazier than we’ve been before but in a good way. 😜

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

BEHEĀDER: I absolutely love getting lost in a project and totally forgetting about time, eating, sleeping, and all those things. Sometimes I get out of bed with a melody or a sound in my head and go straight to my desk to start working on a track. This immersion and dedication are what gives me a feeling of fulfilment and inner happiness. I love to create atmospheres that catch people’s feelings and help them losing themselves in the music.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

BEHEĀDER: Getting excessively isolated and not leaving the house for too many days in a row, feeling lonely, and losing the context of life.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

BEHEĀDER: I can actually be productive and get things done if I just sit down and concentrate for a while if I don’t attend three raves every week.

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

BEHEĀDER: Rorganic – he’s a machine. The frequency in which he’s releasing banger after banger is purely insane. Love his creative ideas and twists. My most played Album would probably be ‘Deaf Safari’ by Felix Laband. It got me through the last summer. What a fantastic piece of work. Check it out if you haven’t yet!

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

BEHEĀDER: Hiking and drinking sencha (煎茶). Both get me into a very meditative and focused mindset and help me to ground my soul. Being out there in nature clears my mind and helps me to realise that all the problems I’m facing in these times aren’t that big at all. I like to get obsessed with things quickly. That’s why Japanese steamed green tea is perfect for me. There are so many things to learn about it, so many different teas to taste, and I can’t wait to expand my collection of Kyūsu (急須) and Yunomi (湯のみ). 😂🤣

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

BEHEĀDER: Travelling! I’m planning on meeting all the lovely people around Europe I met through the internet during these times.

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

BEHEĀDER: Stay open to new and different things. Many people dislike Techno music without ever taking some time to really listen to a few tracks. As a part of this music scene that many in this society dislike or don’t understand, I think it’s the most important thing to stay open-minded and give every new thing you discover a decent chance. One can find beauty in (almost) everything!

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

We have been sitting on this one way too long. We are incredibly excited that we can finally release this set and interview this week. We have an intricate relationship with Pescara and Abruzzo since it is one of our most favourite places in Italy. Not only have they delicious food like ‘Arrosticini Pescara’ but it is also a vibrant and diverse city away from international tourism – a true gem. We thank Felix for his dedicated hardcore mix and interview and thank him for his flexibility and kindness. A big hug to you from both of us, we see you soon. Make sure to check out his other mad-fucking-mixes. Tante Grazie. 🤗😘

 

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

Felix: I’m okay today, but I miss parties and dancing with friends.

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

Felix: It didn’t affect me that much, luckily. I’m just bored and fed up with this situation.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

Felix: It is being able to express myself through what I play without being judged.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

Felix: Boredom and not being able to go out and have fun after a week of work.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

Felix: I learned to feel better about myself and that even alone, you can feel good.

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

Felix: The artist who influenced me the most is definitely STX which is why I started playing.

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

Felix: Maybe watching TV series, things I never did before.

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

Felix: Without a doubt, go to a party, travel and make up for the lost time.

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

Felix: Nothing special, just never give up if you really like something because sooner or later you will achieve what you wanted.

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

We are incredibly pleased to share this mind-blowing Elykua set and interview. Over the past few weeks, we had the opportunity to get to know Elykua. We found a kind, talented, and hardcore loving person from one of our favourite underground cities in Italy, Napoli. We wish everyone a lovely start to this week and hope you can embrace this set for its incredible flow and tight structure. A big hug and lots of love to Napoli. 🤗❤️‍🔥

 

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

Elykua: Positive and hopeful.

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

Elykua: The lockdown was hard because I saw so much unfair and unexpected pain around me. But the isolation helped me reconcile with myself. The rest benefited my mental health, and most importantly, I could dedicate all of myself to music.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

Elykua: Creating music establishes bonds: the energy that I put into one of my tracks can reach someone on the other side of the world. It can console a challenging moment or enrich a happy moment. I love music because it conveys emotions.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

Elykua: Feeling trapped and powerless.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

Elykua: That I can do it by myself.

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

Elykua: Paula Temple, SNTS, SØS Gunver Ryberg.

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

Elykua: To live.

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

Elykua: To establish myself in the techno scene and disseminate my music.

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

Elykua: Long live techno.

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

This week we are incredibly excited to present you our first Artists from Taiwan. We had our eyes towards Taiwan for its progressive LGBT laws and thriving underground culture. We had the pleasure to exchange with Marcë over the past few weeks and can’t wait to set our foot on a plane and meet her in person next year and enjoy a range of Taiwanese food specialities. A massive thanks from the bottom of our hearts for creating this hard and melodic set as well as the interview.

 

joushikijin: How is your mood today?

My mood is calm today. ☺️

joushikijin: How has the pandemic affected your mental health?

Music affects my life quite a lot. It always makes me happy. Of course, there will be some difficulties in life occasionally, but everything goes well.

joushikijin: What do you love most about creating music?

Hard techno.

joushikijin: What have you been struggling with the most during the pandemic?

During this pandemic, many performances were cancelled, but it made me pay more attention to life and health.

joushikijin: What new thing have you learned about yourself during the pandemic?

If the world is no longer peaceful, we will not be able to live in harmony.

joushikijin: Can you name us the artist that has inspired you the most during the pandemic?

Metaraph, 1X1X, and Hadone.

joushikijin: Since the pandemic, what has been your most favourite non-music-related thing to do?

I cannot work because of the epidemic. During this period, I like to spend quality time with my family.

joushikijin: Once the pandemic is over, what are you looking forward to the most?

I’m most looking forward to the moment when I can step on the stage again.

joushikijin: Is there something else on your mind you would like to share with the techno community?

I hope that more and more people in Taiwan will like all kinds of techno styles.

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

16 August 2021

23 August 2021

30 August 2021

6 September 2021

20 September 2021

11 October 2021

18 October 2021

25 October 2021

1 November 2021

8 November 2021

15 November 2021

22 November 2021

29 November 2021

Underground techno | Made in Germany

🇬🇧 During the past few months of the Pandemic chronicles, we rekindled our love for Germany. Both of us were born there, but we haven’t lived there for over two decades.

We witnessed the death of techno caused by mainstream capitalists around the millenium. Engaging with the artists, we were stunned by how well the scene has recovered since. It also showed us how diverse techno has become and that audio quality, access to a diverse library, or distribution are no longer obstacles for music producers.

We aim to investigate what defines underground techno in Germany and interview artists about their views on it. We will be publishing the interviews in German and English, allowing a broader audience to dive into this subculture. We will also ask each artist to record a set for our SoundCloud channel and release both every Wednesday.

🇩🇪 In den letzten paar Monaten der Pandemic chronicles haben wir unsere Liebe für Deutschland neu entdeckt. Wir sind beide in Karlsruhe geboren, haben aber die letzten zwanzig Jahre anderswo gelebt.

Wir haben den Tod von Techno durch Mainstream-Kapitalismus um die Jahrtausendwende miterlebt. Durch das Auseinandersetzen mit den Kunstschaffenden haben wir gelernt, wie sich die Szene seitdem erholt hat und gewachsen ist. Auch hat uns positiv überrascht, dass Audioqualität, Zugang zu guten Tracks oder die Distribution keine Hindernisse mehr für Musikproduzierende sind.

Unser Ziel ist es zu definieren, was Underground Techno in Deutschland ist und durch das Befragen von Kunstschaffenden deren Meinung zu dem Thema zu erfahren. Wir werden die Interviews in deutscher und englischer Sprache publizieren, um einem breit gefächerten Publikum einen Einblick in diese Subkultur zu geben. Jede Befragung wird von einem Set für unseren Soundcloud-Kanal begleitet und beides Mittwochs veröffentlicht.

Interviews

We thank our dear friend HLUNKE for starting the Underground techno – Made in Germany project. He provided us with an excellent interview and massive live set from the last ‘0815 Secret Rave’, which he organises periodically with his Castrop-Rauxel crew Dopaminmangel/0815 Techno.
 
 
joushikijin: How do you feel today?

HLUNKE: I feel quite balanced today, relaxed for the most part. I had a pretty techno heavy weekend, which is still a bit in my bones. However, today I am not followed by any great emotions. Everything is on a constant level – just relaxed.

joushikijin: What is underground techno for you?

HLUNKE: For me, underground techno is first and foremost passion. I am referring to the literal meaning of the word passion. So, in my view, something where people and actors activate and take action to the extent that they make many sacrifices – genuinely passionate about something. When people do things that cost extra without working for profit and invest there as well, in this context, I mean raves, you’re at an underground party. These people are also happy to make these sacrifices for the underground. An old friend of mine once said: ‘From the underground for the underground.’ I enjoy that a lot in the rave scene. There the raves are only organised in the spirit of the rave. There, it’s all about the cause, about techno. Raves are organised to come together, dance, share, have fun, switch off, be, escape the social norm, and exchange criticism and encouragement among artists.

For me, underground techno is everything that is not made for the masses. By this, I mean, for example, sub-genre in sound, illegal raves or also the use of drugs. I don’t mean to say that underground is to use or possibly abuse drugs. No, I’m just saying that the use of drugs underground is not an uncommon picture. A specific niche in the techno genre that only a fraction of techno heads worldwide listen to and never gets on the public radar, that’s underground techno for me. Sometimes you have to search for underground techno, almost dig for it, at least if you look for it on the internet. Raves are also not always easily accessible, and not everyone finds out where they take place. There are slight parallels between the music itself and the underground parties. I just remembered something else that is essential.

joushikijin: What was the most extraordinary rave you ever attended?

HLUNKE: Now that I’ve been thinking about it for a while and couldn’t see any rave standing out, I’d say they were all exceptional. I’d say I’ve probably been to about 50 raves so far. And it’s always something extraordinary. Whether it’s the location, set-up, people, or things that happen. It’s hard to say if I’m honest. I also think the only thing I consider ordinary about all the raves is that there’s music playing and people dancing. 

joushikijin: What aspects of underground techno do you like the most?

HLUNKE: I think I have to say with a smile, ‘That everyone can do what they want.’

joushikijin: What best describes your emotions when listening to techno?

HLUNKE: You’re asking another complex question. I don’t think anything can describe my emotions because I can’t even do it myself. For me, all emotions are present in techno or at least evoked by it. It depends on the techno I listen to, which, for some reason, brings out certain emotions. Again, for each person individually. I think fear and disgust are the emotions rarely, if ever, evoked in me when listening to techno.

joushikijin: What distinguishes underground from mainstream techno?

HLUNKE: For this purpose, I will compare an official party, for example, in a club or a festival next to an illegal rave. The rave somewhere in an old warehouse or deep in the woods, which through its nature, such as the tension of being exposed, crazy locations, or the fact that no banners are hanging on fences or there is no security staff, this rave takes on a unique dynamic through these circumstances, which you will never experience at a mainstream party. If I have to pay 30 euros for admission to a mainstream party where, for example, to see Sven Väth or Marika Rossa, and 5 euros for simple water or beer, and people are trying to sell me cigarettes or lighters – what does that have to do with techno? It takes the fun out of celebrating. I’d rather stand in the rain, soaking wet, and watch people dance to the music with me than dance next to a fence somewhere and see cocktail bars closed off as VIP areas. Mainstream is always connected with commerce to a certain extent, and you rarely find that in the underground.

At raves like this, it’s always harmonious, and people help each other so that everything runs smoothly. For example, if a generator fails somewhere in a forest. Believe me. People will do anything to get the fucking thing running again. .. Even if it’s giving their last shirt, that applies to guests and organisers alike. The only thing that matters is that the sound comes out of the speakers again. If you’ve ever witnessed something like this, you’ll know the cheers when the sound comes back on. These are moments that one remembers. These are feelings and emotions. It’s a bit different from the music itself. You can tell, by the fact, that mainstream techno can also be heard at the odd rave. Musically, underground is everything that is not wanted by the vast majority or is not even noticed because it receives so little popularity. Mainstream techno is what is made so that it appeals to the most people … Several factors and variables trigger the majority to consume this music.

joushikijin: What equipment do you currently prefer to play with and why?

HLUNKE: The question is easy. I prefer to play on the equipment I’m used to. At the moment, this is a Pioneer XDJ-RX2 all-in-one system. It’s super easy for me to use. I’ve been playing it for almost two years now. It has everything I need, and the sound card also does a good job, I discovered. Since I am quite satisfied with the device, I have not yet considered buying anything else. It’s also always a question of money. Of course, I also play on a Pioneer set-up or an Allen & Heath mixer. The only thing is, I don’t own them, so they are not even considered. I don’t make myself dependent on any device or equipment. I think I could play on any device if given half an hour to settle in.

joushikijin: Where do you get your creativity to make music?

HLUNKE: From everywhere. Once you understand creativity, you know that it is not difficult to be creative. I think everyone always makes such a drama out of the fact that someone is oh so creative … What is creativity? It’s first and foremost nothing more than linking things together that previously had no connection. You can be creative with colours, sounds and instruments, but it is not the sounds that are creative but the person who produces the sounds or combines colours. I also think creativity happens in the moment. So I can’t plan creativity, either I am creative in the present moment or I am not. However, I also have to say that I get my inspiration from everywhere. Whether it’s other artists or a commercial where I hear something interesting, it can be even a barking dog in the park … So I don’t limit myself there. ‘Sting’ is also an incredible musician and artist who has demonstrated precisely how creativity works and how it can be realised, even if everyone advises you against it.

joushikijin: Do you work towards a specific musical goal?

HLUNKE: At the moment I can’t really answer the question. I used to have a goal that I was working towards with my boys, but things have changed since then. We are at a completely different point now than when we’re setting these goals. I think my only goal at the moment is to ‘MAKE’ in whatever way I can. I don’t know where this journey will take me, but it goes on steadily, and I rely entirely on what is and how I deal with it best. I try to feel and live the music and the moments, be in the now and make beautiful moments possible for as many people as possible.

Dear Dénis and Lea, thank you so much for letting me be part of your project. I wish you both only the very best and a little bit of the bad things. 😜 A massive hug.

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

We are incredibly delighted to share this absolute gem of a set (just look at the waveform) with the rest of you. HeizÖL has been a staple of our playlist, and we are excited about each new set he puts out there. We also thank him for taking the time to take our phone call and providing us with his insight on the series topic. We also thank our friends at Dopaminmangel/0815 Techno.

 

joushikijin: How do you feel today?

HeizÖL: I am feeling quite well today. I can’t complain. So actually, it’s the same as always.  😂

joushikijin: What is underground techno for you?

HeizÖL: Underground techno, … for me is, argh … freedom, that you can be the way you want to be. You can do that in clubs as well, but I think it’s something else. Underground for me is just in the forest or in a tunnel, real dirty locations, and stuff. Simply dirty techno music. That’s underground for me.

joushikijin: What was the most extraordinary rave you ever attended?

HeizÖL: My most unusual rave was the Secret Rave with 0815 in a railway tunnel. That was definitely the most memorable rave so far. The sound alone, the echo through the location, unreal.

joushikijin: What aspects of underground techno do you like the most?

HeizÖL: That everyone supports one another, that no one is on a different level, but that everyone is equal. Also that you can be free, be what you want without being maligned or portrayed poorly.

joushikijin: What best describes your emotions when listening to techno?

HeizÖL: Goosebumps, … love. Feelings of happiness come up, feeling incredibly good. I feel free, I don’t think about anything, and I only feel the music, and it flows through my entire body. This is unreal.

joushikijin: What distinguishes underground from mainstream techno?

HeizÖL: In my opinion, unknown artists sometimes make better music than most mainstream people. Well, the underground is not promoted, but why should it be? As I said last time, people like David Guetta push a button, and then they’re done. The underground venues are also primarily small groups but with the most extraordinary people. Another aspect, underground is still affordable. Most underground raves are financed with donations. Compared to the mainstream, where you sometimes pay hundreds of euros to see an artist. It’s not for me, and it doesn’t have to be like that.

joushikijin: What equipment do you currently prefer to play with and why?

HeizÖL: I prefer to play with the equipment that I have here at home. I am familiar with that. I am working with Pioneer DDJ-400 and Pioneer DDJ-XP2. This is my equipment at the moment. But I want to upgrade and get the Pioneer DDJ-800 or Pioneer DDJ-1000. Unfortunately, I don’t have the money for the other players yet. 😂I’m being honest here. One has to start small. But I am also the most familiar with my equipment. I also record most of my sets with my hardware here at home.

joushikijin: Where do you get your creativity to make music?

HeizÖL: I’ve always made music, and I just stand in front of it, and then it just flows. I just let everything come to me and don’t think much at all. I find I’m not free when I think. Actually, I motivate myself; playing is my hobby. I love it. Plus, I also produce to self-actualise a wee bit. It’s fun, and it allows you to switch off from everyday life.

joushikijin: Do you work towards a specific musical goal?

HeizÖL: Honestly, not at all. I feel like it’s my hobby to perform in a group. It’s not my goal to market myself and collect followers, and so on. I don’t take any heat, and I don’t force anything, like paying for anything extra. Why should I? Should I do become better known, then that’s just how it is. And if not, that’s no big deal either. It would still be my hobby even if I did it professionally.

 

Visit our SoundCloud page to enjoy the set.

Ganz herzlichen Dank an unseren mittlerweile sehr ans Herz gewachsenen Freund HLUNKE für dieses bombastische Set und Interview. Die Aufnahme ist von unseren Freunden Dopaminmangel/0815 aus Castrop-Rauxel. Diese haben vergangenes Wochenende einen „0815 Secret Rave“ organisiert hatten, von welchem diese Aufnahme stammt.

 

joushikijin: Wie fühlst Du Dich heute?

HLUNKE: Ich fühle mich heute recht ausgeglichen, bin weitestgehend entspannt. Ich hatte ein Recht Technolastiges Wochenende, welches mir noch ein wenig in den Knochen hängt, doch ich würde sagen, heute werde ich nicht von großartigen Emotionen begleitet, ist alles auf einer gleichbleibenden Ebene – alles entspannt eben.

joushikijin: Was ist Underground Techno für Dich?

HLUNKE: Underground Techno ist für mich in erster Linie Leidenschaft. Und dabei beziehe ich mich auf die genaue Bedeutung des Wortes Leidenschaft. Also meiner Ansicht nach etwas, wo sich die Menschen und Akteure soweit aktivieren und tätig werden, dass sie viele Opfer bringen – es eben „Leiden schafft“. Und wenn Menschen Dinge tun, die einen gewissen Mehraufwand haben und dort auch noch investieren, in diesem Kontext meine ich damit Raves, ohne dabei dem Profit zu folgen, dann weil man das man auf einer Undergroundparty ist. Diese Menschen bringen diese Opfer auch gern für den Untergrund. Ein alter Freund von mir hat mal gesagt: „Aus dem Untergrund für den Untergrund“. Das genieße ich in der Raverszene auch sehr, dort werden die Raves nur im Sinne des Raves veranstaltet. Dort geht es um die Sache, um Techno. Raves werden doch gemacht, um zusammenzukommen, um zu tanzen, um zu teilen, um Spaß zu haben, um Abschalten zu können, um zu sein, der gesellschaftlichen Norm zu entfliehen, um Austausch von Kritik und Zuspruch unter Künstlern.

Underground Techno ist für mich alles, was nicht für die breite Masse gemacht ist. Damit meine ich zum Beispiel Sub Genre im Sound, illegale Raves oder auch der Konsum von Drogen. Damit möchte ich jetzt nicht sagen, dass es Underground ist, wenn man Drogen konsumiert und dann womöglich noch missbraucht. Nein, damit will ich nur sagen, dass der Konsum von Drogen im Untergrund kein ungewöhnliches Bild ist. Eine bestimmte Nische im Technogenre, welches nur ein Bruchteil der Technoheads weltweit hört, das wird niemals auf dem öffentlichen Radar auffällig, das ist für mich Underground Techno. Underground Techno muss man teilweise wirklich suchen, fast schon danach graben, zumindest, wenn man im Internet mal danach schaut. Auch Raves sind nicht immer leicht zugänglich und auch nicht jeder erfährt, wo diese stattfinden. Es lassen sich leichte Parallelen erkennen zwischen der Musik selbst und den Untergrund Partys. Mir fällt gerade noch etwas Essenzielles ein.

joushikijin: Was war der außergewöhnlichste Rave, den Du jemals besucht hast?

HLUNKE: Da ich jetzt schon eine Weile nachgedacht habe und nicht wirklich erkennen konnte, dass irgendein Rave dabei heraussticht, würde ich sagen, dass alle außergewöhnlich waren. Ich würde sagen, dass ich bisher bestimmt auf so 50 Raves war. Und es irgendetwas ist immer außergewöhnlich. Ob die Location, die Aufmachung, die Leute, die Dinge, die passieren. Das ist schwer zu sagen, wenn ich ehrlich bin. Ich glaube auch das Einzige, was ich bei den ganzen Raves als gewöhnlich erachte ist, dass dort Musik läuft und Menschen tanzen. 😊

joushikijin: Welche Aspekte von Underground Techno gefallen Dir am meisten?

HLUNKE: Ich denke, da muss ich mit einem Lächeln sagen „Dass jeder machen kann, was er will.“

joushikijin: Was beschreibt deine Emotionen beim Hören von Techno am besten?

HLUNKE: Du schon wieder eine komplexe Frage. Ich glaube, dass nichts meine Emotionen beschreiben kann, da ich es selbst nicht mal kann. Es sind für mich alle Emotionen im Techno vorhanden, zumindest werden durch Techno hervorgerufen. Es kommt auf den Techno, an den ich höre, der bringt dann aus irgendwelchen Gründen die bestimmten Emotionen hervor. Bei jedem Menschen wieder individuell. Ich denke, Angst und Ekel sind die Emotionen, die bei mir kaum bis gar nicht hervorgerufen werden, wenn ich Techno höre.

joushikijin: Was unterscheidet Underground- von Mainstreamtechno?

HLUNKE: Dazu betrachte ich mal kurz eine offizielle Party, meinetwegen in einem Club oder ein Festival neben einem illegalen Rave. Der Rave irgendwo in einer alten Lagerhalle oder tief im Wald, der durch seine Umstände wie z. B. die Anspannungen aufzufliegen, verrückte Locations der Tatsache, dass es kein Sicherheitspersonal gibt oder dort keine Werbebanner an Zäunen hängen, dieser Rave nimmt durch solche Gegebenheiten eine ganz eigene Dynamik, welche man auf einer Mainstreamparty niemals erleben wird. Wenn ich auf einer Mainstreamparty, wo z. B. Sven Väth und Marika Rossa auflegen, werden beim Einlass schon 30,- Euro und für ein popliges Wasser oder Bier gleich 5,- Euro zahlen soll, irgendwelche Leute, die einem Kippen oder Feuerzeuge andrehen – was hat das denn mit Techno zu tun? Da vergeht mir echt der Spaß beim Feiern. Ich steh lieber im Regen völlig durchnässt und erlebe wie die Leute mit mir zu der Musik abgehen, als irgendwo neben einem Zaun zu tanzen und Cocktailbars abgesperrt als VIP-Bereich zu sehen. Mainstream ist ein Stück weit immer mit Kommerz verbunden und das findet man im Untergrund selten.

Auf so Raves ist es immer harmonisch und die Leute helfen sich gegenseitig damit alles rund läuft. Fällt mal ein Generator aus irgendwo in einem Wald. Glaub mir die Leute tun alles dafür damit das scheiß Ding wieder läuft … Und wenn es deren letztes Hemd ist, Gast oder Veranstalter. Hauptsache der Sound schallt wieder aus den Boxen. Wenn man so etwas schon mal mitbekommen hat, wird man wissen, mit welch einem Jubel das gefeiert wird, sobald der Sound wieder läuft. Das sind Augenblicke, die hängen bleiben. Das sind Gefühle und Emotionen. Bei der Musik selbst ist es ein bisschen anders, das erkennt man daran, dass auch Mainstream Techno auf dem einen oder anderen Rave zu hören ist. Musikalisch gesehen ist Underground all das, was von der großen Mehrheit nicht gewollt ist oder gar nicht erst wahrgenommen wird, weil es so wenig Popularität erhält. Mainstream Techno ist das was für viele Leute gemacht ist damit es auch die meisten Leute anspricht … Anscheinend gibt es da ein paar Faktoren und Variablen, die bei der Mehrheit auslösen diese Musik zu konsumieren.

joushikijin: Mit welchem Equipment spielst Du derzeit am liebsten und wieso?

HLUNKE: Die Frage ist einfach. Ich spiele am liebsten auf dem gewohnten Equipment. Zurzeit ist das ein Pioneer XDJ-RX2 All-in-One-System. Für mich supereinfach zu bedienen, spiele ich nun seit fast 2 Jahren drauf. Er hat alles, was ich brauche und die Soundkarte leistet auch gute Arbeit, durfte ich feststellen. Da ich recht zufrieden bin mit dem Gerät, habe ich es bisher noch nicht beabsichtigt, etwas anderes zu kaufen. Ist auch immer eine Frage des Geldes. Klar spiele ich auch auf einem Set-up von Pioneer oder einem Allen & Heath Mixer. Nur das besitze ich nicht und fällt somit vom Treppchen. Ich mache mich nicht von irgendeinem Gerät oder Equipment abhängig, ich glaube, ich könnte auf jedem Gerät spielen, wenn man mir eine halbe Stunde zum Einfinden gibt.

joushikijin: Woher nimmst Du deine Kreativität, Musik zu machen?

HLUNKE: Von überall. Wenn man Kreativität einmal verstanden hat, weiß man, dass es nicht schwer ist, kreativ zu sein. Ich finde, alle machen immer so ein Drama daraus, dass jemand ja ach so kreativ sei … Was ist denn Kreativität? Kreativität ist doch in erster Linie nichts weiteres als Dinge miteinander zu verknüpfen, welche vorher keine Verbindung hatten. Andererseits kann man auch mit Farben kreativ werden oder mit Tönen und Instrumenten, doch da sind ja nicht die Töne kreativ, sondern derjenige, welcher die Töne erzeugt oder Farben miteinander kombiniert. Außerdem glaube ich, dass Kreativität im Augenblick/Moment passiert. Kreativität kann ich also nicht planen, entweder bin ich in dem jetzigen Augenblick kreativ oder ich bin es eben nicht. Ich muss allerdings auch sagen, dass ich mir meine Inspiration von überall weghole. Ob es andere Künstler sind, ob es ein Werbeausschnitt ist, in dem ich etwas Interessantes höre, es kann bellen von einer Hundewiese sein … Also da schränke ich mich nicht ein. „Sting“ ist auch ein wunderbarer Musiker und Künstler, der genau vorgemacht hat, wie Kreativität funktioniert und wie diese umgesetzt werden kann, selbst wenn dir jeder davon abrät.

joushikijin: Gibt es ein spezifisches Ziel, auf das Du musikalisch hinarbeitest?

HLUNKE: Derzeit kann ich die Frage nicht so recht beantworten. Ich hatte mal ein Ziel, auf das ich mit meinen Jungs hingearbeitet habe, doch mittlerweile hat sich einiges geändert, wir stehen an einem ganz anderen Punkt als zu der Zeit in man sich die Ziele gesetzt hat. Ich denke, dass mein einziges Ziel derzeit das „MACHEN“ ist, in welcher Hinsicht auch immer. Ich weiß nicht, wo diese Reise mich hinführt, doch es geht stetig weiter und verlasse mich da ganz auf das, was ist und wie ich damit am besten umgehe. Ich versuche einfach die Musik und die Momente zu fühlen und zu leben, im Moment zu sein und vielen Menschen schöne Momente zu ermöglichen.

Lieber Dénis und liebe Lea, ich danke euch herzlichst Teil eures Projektes sein zu dürfen und wünsche euch beiden nur das aller Beste und ein bisschen von dem Schlechten. 😜 Dicken Drücker

 

Besucht unsere SoundCloud Seite, um das Set zu genießen.

Ganz vielen lieben Dank an HeizÖL für den kontinuierlichen Support unserer Projekte sowie der permanenten Versorgung mit exzellenter Sets. Die Waveform von diesem gibt bereits einen guten Indikator, wie Wild es ist. Wir danken für das Telefoninterview und den Einblick hinter die Kulissen. Liebe Grüße gehen auch an unsere Freunde von Dopaminmangel/0815 Techno.

 

joushikijin: Wie fühlst Du Dich heute?

HeizÖL: Also, ich fühle mich ganz gut. Ich kann mich nicht beklagen. Also eigentlich wie immer. 😂

joushikijin: Was ist Underground Techno für Dich?

HeizÖL: Underground Techno, … ist für mich, boah … Freiheit, dass man so sein kann, wie man will. Kannst du zwar in Klubs auch, ist aber noch was anderes find ich, Underground ist für mich halt im Wald oder im Tunnel richtig, so richtige dreckige Locations und so. Aber auch einfach dreckiger Techno. Das ist für mich Underground.

joushikijin: Was war der außergewöhnlichste Rave, den Du jemals besucht hast?

HeizÖL: Mein außergewöhnlichster Rave war der Secret Rave mit 0815 in einem Eisenbahntunnel. Das war definitiv der geilste Rave bis dato. Der Sound allein, das Echo durch die Location, bombastisch.

joushikijin: Welche Aspekte von Underground Techno gefallen Dir am meisten?

HeizÖL: Dass sich alle gegenseitig unterstützen, dass keiner auf einem anderen Niveau ist, sondern alle gleichgestellt sind. Auch das man frei sein kann, so sein, wie man will, ohne dabei schlecht gemacht oder dargestellt zu werden.

joushikijin: Was beschreibt deine Emotionen beim Hören von Techno am besten?

HeizÖL: Gänsehaut, … Liebe. Da kommen Glücksgefühle hoch, mir geht es gut. Ich fühle mich frei, ich denke dann an Garnichts und fühle nur die Musik und die geht durch den ganzen Körper. Das ist unnormal.

joushikijin: Was unterscheidet Underground- von Mainstreamtechno?

HeizÖL: Unbekannte Künstler machen meiner Meinung nach zum Teil bessere Musik als die ganzen Leute aus dem Mainstream. Na ja, der Underground wird nicht gefördert, aber warum denn auch. Wie ich schon beim letzten Mal gesagt hatte, Leute wie David Guetta drücken ein Knöpfchen und dann sind die fertig. Auch die Underground Locations sind meist kleine Runden, aber dafür mit den geilsten Leuten. Ein weiterer Aspekt, Underground kann man sich noch leisten. Meistens werden die Underground-Raves mit Spenden finanziert. Im Vergleich zu Mainstream, wo du zum Teil Hunderte von Euros zahlst, um einen Künstler zu sehen. Das ist nicht für mich, das muss nicht sein.

joushikijin: Mit welchem Equipment spielst Du derzeit am liebsten und wieso?

HeizÖL: Am liebsten spiele ich mit meinem Equipment, dass ich hier zu Hause habe. Damit bin ich vertraut. Das ist der Pioneer DDJ-400 und der Pioneer DDJ-XP2. Das ist mein Equipment momentan. Aber ich will aufstocken und mir den Pioneer DDJ-800 oder den Pioneer DDJ-1000 holen. Für die anderen Player habe ich leider noch keine Kohle. 😂 Bin ich ehrlich. Man muss klein anfangen. Ich bin aber mit meinen Geräten aber auch am vertrautesten. Die meisten meiner Sets nehme ich auch hier zu Hause auf.

joushikijin: Woher nimmst Du deine Kreativität, Musik zu machen?

HeizÖL: Ich habe schon immer Musik gemacht und ich stell mich einfach davor und dann fließt es einfach. Ich lass alles einfach auf mich zukommen und denke gar nicht viel nach, ich finde, beim Nachdenken bin ich nicht frei. Eigentlich motiviere ich mich selbst, es ist mein Hobby. Ich mach es gerne, mich damit auseinanderzusetzen, auch zu produzieren, ein bisschen selbst zu verwirklichen. Macht halt Bock, … Spaß und es erlaubt vom Alltag abzuschalten.

joushikijin: Gibt es ein spezifisches Ziel, auf das Du musikalisch hinarbeitest?

HeizÖL: Ehrlich gesagt überhaupt nicht. Ich habe Lust drauf, es ist mein Hobby, in einer Gruppe aufzulegen. Es ist nicht mein Ziel, mich zu vermarkten und Followers zu sammeln und so weiter. Es kommt, wie es kommt, ich beeinfluss das nicht, dass ich irgendetwas extra bezahle, warum auch. Falls ich doch bekannter werden sollte, dann ist das halt so korrekt gelaufen. Und wenn nicht, ist das auch nicht schlimm. Es bleibt auch dann noch mein Hobby, falls ich es beruflich machen würde.

 

Besucht unsere SoundCloud Seite, um das Set zu genießen.

Write us ♥️

techno@joushikijin.net

Manifesto

Our approach

We are two psychologists who collaborate with others to work towards a sounder techno culture. We use TEC₁₁H₁₅NO₂ to promote equality, address mental health issues, and educate on safe drug use.

We are queer

We always identified as human beings first and never seen gender as part of our social identity. Thus, we don’t apply this label to us.

We are inclusive

We have zero-fucking-tolerance for intolerance and don’t accept sexism, racism, or any other form of discrimination. We want everyone to feel safe when interacting with us, regardless of physique, orientation, or preferences. We celebrate diversity and provide a judgement-free environment.

We are anarchists

We reject coercive forms of hierarchy and base all our collaborations on the principle that we are equals. We are scientists and use our education and professional expertise to challenge the status quo in all aspects of life.

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